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Information of Fiber Media Converter

Fiber Media converters enable you to connect different types of media, such as twisted pair, fiber, and coax, within a network. The most common use for media converters is to insert fiber segments into copper networks. This enables you the ability extend your Ethernet network beyond the 100-meter limit imposed by copper cable.

With one of the largest selections of commercial and industrial media converters in the industry, you’ll find the right one for your application. For enterprise-wide systems, choose from chassis-based converters. To connect VoIP phones or take fiber to the desktop, select mini converters that tuck behind your PC. To power distant wireless access points and security cameras, choose PoE Switeches. You can even add 10-Gig extension with media converters.

Network operators indicate that capacity is doubling in their networks every six months. According toIDC, worldwide broadband traffic for both wireline and mobile activity could reach 116,539 petabytes per month by 2015. This continued need for bandwidth is being driven both by more people accessing video via PCs and TVs and also by their increasing use of mobile smart devices to access information anywhere at any time. People around the world now leverage networks as a daily part of how they communicate and share information during both their work and personal lives.

To bolster and speed up network infrastructures, network operators began volume implementations of 100G optical equipment in 2012. 100G took off much more quickly than 40G, as all network players bought into to the overarching need for 100G and developed a healthy supply chain with a variety of competing building blocks.

Many experts believe 100G will play a central role in transmission much the way 10G did in the past. 100G creates a new baseline for network performance by using bandwidth in an efficient way; it aligns with 100GbE standards, and today’s 100G technology is expected to serve as the foundation for higher transmission line rates in the future. Implementation of 100G started as line cards much like 10G did in its day, and the packaging will quickly become smaller due to new developments in photonic components that drive down costs and power requirements.